Power outage hits Texas as drought drags on

Power outages are sweeping through Texas as the state struggles to avoid an extended drought, with many areas struggling to cope with the loss of power. 

The power outage on Friday was the worst in at least a decade, and was the third major blackout in Texas in less than a week. 

According to the Weather Channel, the storm hit the state at 10:30 a.m.

(0630 GMT) Friday. 

The storm also knocked out power to the Houston area for about an hour, but officials said it was expected to return. 

“It’s a very severe weather event, and it’s not something we expect to have happen again anytime soon,” said Houston-area Emergency Management Director Mike McManus.

“The storm caused significant damage to buildings, including power lines and utility poles, and the flooding and mudslides that we’ve seen in some parts of the state.” 

The state’s Department of Public Safety tweeted that some 400,000 customers were without power, and that the department was “still assessing the extent of damage.” 

Texas Gov.

Greg Abbott tweeted that the state was “out of options” and that it would take “many days” to recover from the damage. 

Officials say there is no immediate threat to the state’s water supply. 

A state official told the Associated Press that a “major, significant storm system” could impact the state as early as Monday.

The state was already bracing for a major drought. 

This is a storm system, so if you have an outage that is severe and you don’t have a backup plan, you may not be able to get water until it’s too late,” said Patrick O’Connor, Texas state climatologist.

Texas Gov Greg Abbott said in a tweet that the “state is out of options.

The storm system is moving toward Texas.

Meanwhile, the weather agency says there is “little or no threat to agriculture” in the region, but the National Weather Service issued an advisory for severe weather conditions in parts of southeast Texas.”

If the storm system does reach the state, the response will be massive.” 

Meanwhile, the weather agency says there is “little or no threat to agriculture” in the region, but the National Weather Service issued an advisory for severe weather conditions in parts of southeast Texas.