New research suggests you’re more likely to die from an overdose of lithium in the UK than from smoking a cigarette Independent

A study has found that people who use the power source lithium in their homes have an 80% higher chance of dying from an accidental overdose of the drug.

It was carried out by researchers from the University of Bath and published today in the peer-reviewed journal, Environmental Health Perspectives.

The researchers found that they were able to link a significant number of cases of acute overdose of drugs to people who had been using the power supply for at least six months.

The study also revealed that the risk of dying due to an overdose from a power supply is almost twice as high as people who used tobacco.

The team, from the Department of Health, Health Protection Agency and Public Health England, say that lithium is the most common drug overdose risk factor.

“There is strong evidence that lithium use is associated with the development of cardiovascular, lung and renal disease, as well as being associated with a higher risk of death,” said Professor Andrew Stokes, who led the study.

A spokesperson for the Department for Health and Safety said: “Lithium is an important and widely used energy source, but our advice is to avoid its use, especially in the early stages of the power system.” “

We recommend that consumers who wish to use lithium avoid it.”

A spokesperson for the Department for Health and Safety said: “Lithium is an important and widely used energy source, but our advice is to avoid its use, especially in the early stages of the power system.”

“These products are safe and can be safely used by anyone.””

Lithumina batteries are considered safer than other lithium-ion battery products for use as a home-use power supply.””

These products are safe and can be safely used by anyone.”

Lithumina batteries are considered safer than other lithium-ion battery products for use as a home-use power supply.

“The Government and manufacturers of these products are working closely with the industry to ensure this information is made available.”

This article was updated on 14 April 2018.